Of making many books...

There Is No End

Most students of Chinese just learn Mandarin. A few just learn Cantonese (or other Chinese hua such as Shanghainese). But there must be a few who need to learn both Mandarin and Cantonese. Yet there is very little help available for this group. In my case, I am living in Hong Kong (Cantonese speaking) and Shenzhen (Mandarin speaking), so any help for learning both languages would be useful. Of course, more...

book review Based on his previous book on how to learn Japanese characters (reviewed here), Heisig has teamed with Richardson, wbo wrote his doctorate on adapting Heisig's method to Chinese, to produce a guide to learning the first 1500 characters. There is also a version for traditional characters, and volume 2 of each text (when they eventually appear) will cover another 1500 characters. Heisig and Richardson have a page on their publisher's website with a free download of the introduction and the first few chapters, and also of the errata to date. more...

What Hanzidamus is a help to memorizing the tones of some Mandarin characters also a help to learning groups of homophones based on Heisig and Richardson's Remembering Hanzi books (review). doggerel something I am writing myself hopefully, something that will help other people learn Mandarin pronunciation too. What Hanzidamus is not a way of memorizing the complete pronunciation of a Chinese character any use when learning Cantonese or any other form of Chinese other than Mandarin accurate, or at least this is an alpha version, and you can expect errors; it would be helpful if you could point them out poetry or even tolerable verse, the lines don't scan properly and the rimes are approximate at best standard English; the author speaks General Australian and pronounces 'paw', 'pore', and 'poor' the same; the rimes reflect this meaning sense Chinese text; the Chinese characters along the second row are not intended to be read as a line of text Note This is based on my observation that the hardest part of a Chinese syllable to remember (at least, for a native English speaker) is the tone; we are used to consonants and vowels, but not tones, so we need to focus on learning the tones. more...