Of making many books...

There Is No End

Much darker than Carey's "Terre d'Anges" series, this series (without explicitly mentioning it) presents the story of Lord of the Rings from the viewpoint of the other side. Not that the characters or the places have the same names, but the similarities are made obvious enough for the reader not to be in any doubt, The story is considerably changed (otherwise it would be a rather boring book), so Banewreaker in part is based on The Hobbit and part on The Fellowship of the Ring. more...

...and I have read it all. It must be at least 4000 pages, a million words, longer than the Bible, longer than Homer, longer that the Mahbharata... was it worth it? Certainly Rowling and her publishers were able to maintain interest in the book up to its publication. Wikipedia has managed to summarise the last book in a page, so why did Rowling need 600 pages? So will the books be read in a hundred years' time like Edith Nesbit? more...

Well, ok, perhaps it's me, but I think he has reached the stage where there is a legion of loyal fans who will buy and read anything that he writes, and he doesn'y have any hope of reaching a wider readership, so he doesn't try. Or, alternatively, he has transcended the genre and he is now writing works of great literary value. Perhaps it's my lack of taste. more...

Do people really believe that reading Harry Potter can, sort of, invite evil creatures into the world? I mean, have they been reading too much Lovecraft and watching too many Linda Blair films, and they actually think it's true? Does the concept of evidence mean anything to these people? Where do they get it all from? Now the books have this idea of character based ethics, and maybe this is what our witch-hunters don't like. more...

The first two volumes, it seemed to me, were some of the most impressive fantasy since Tolkein. Dart-Thornton's powers of description are considerable and, in particular, her ability to evoke landscape is excellent (following Tolkein, this is fantasy by bushwalking). Another strength of the first two volumes is the strong narrative. Dart-Thornton's powers of invention are strong, and the plot is always moving in a new direction (literally). She also has a strong sense of continuity, in the cinematic sense. more...