Of making many books...

There Is No End

Reinert bases the book on two sources of evidence, his collection of pre-Ricardo economic texts and his personal experience as an entrepreneur and development economics academic expert. He asks, what did the rich countries believe about economics when they were becoming rich? He looks at the English before Ricardo, the Dutch in the 1600s, and the Germans from the 1600s to the 1900s. He also looks at the Morgenthau plan (the Allies' initial plan in 1945 to return Germany to a purely agricultural economy) and the later Marshall plan (to re-industrialise Germany, later applied to other European countries, Japan and Korea). more...

Now it might be said that Taleb's argument can be simply put as, Do not assume a normal distribution. But then, so much of the quantative analysis that underlay financial risk models (and the consequent assurances of financial stability) were based on just that assumption. As far as I could tell, the only justification anyone ever presented was that it made the mathematics possible. Possible, but delivering predictions that did not match up to what actually happened. more...

It must lose them sales and customers, and it would not be to hard for them to fix. I have even told them about it myself. But they still continue... I should explain that I do not live, and have never lived, in the United States. Amazon know that, as they have my billing address and my shipping address, and a history of my addresses as I have move from place to place around the world, and I have ordered various books from them. more...

Although this is described as economics, it really is the application of statistics to sociology or to current affairs. Levitt and Dubner — Levitt is the economist and Dubner the writer — have taken methods more commonly used in economics, and applied them to such questions as: cheating by school teachers and sumo wrestlers the abuse of information by real estate agents and the Klu Klux Klan the economics of crack dealing the decline in the crime rate, and the extent that parents contribute to their children's success. more...