Of making many books...

There Is No End

Much darker than Carey's "Terre d'Anges" series, this series (without explicitly mentioning it) presents the story of Lord of the Rings from the viewpoint of the other side. Not that the characters or the places have the same names, but the similarities are made obvious enough for the reader not to be in any doubt, The story is considerably changed (otherwise it would be a rather boring book), so Banewreaker in part is based on The Hobbit and part on The Fellowship of the Ring. more...

The authors is an evangelical pastor based in Washington, and he gives us his views on progressive politics in the United States over the past few years. Wallis argues for an interpretation of the Christian religion that accords with most of the positions of the progrssive tendency in American politics, drawing heavily on Deuteronomy, the minor prophets and the synoptic gospels. He argues that the use of religious imagery by the Bush administration and its supporters is bad theology. more...

Why do people, if asked, say they believe one thing, yet in practice act as if they believed something quite different? In this new work, Sloan gives several examples: Football fans pray to God to help their team win, although God does not favour any team. Calvinists officially believe that everything is the work of God, and human will has no effect on the world, but in practice they act as if hard work brought material benefits. more...

I disagree with parts of Batchelor's book; but my disagreements are not those of Ven. Bodhi. Batchelor seems to be taking the same approach to Buddhism as Thurman - he aims to present the teaching of the Buddha as rational and... 'unpious' is the best word I can come up with (not 'impious'). I think that Batchelor overdoes the rational bit and neglects the roles of (a) ritual and (b) the monastic and lay community. more...