Of making many books...

There Is No End

Reinert bases the book on two sources of evidence, his collection of pre-Ricardo economic texts and his personal experience as an entrepreneur and development economics academic expert. He asks, what did the rich countries believe about economics when they were becoming rich? He looks at the English before Ricardo, the Dutch in the 1600s, and the Germans from the 1600s to the 1900s. He also looks at the Morgenthau plan (the Allies' initial plan in 1945 to return Germany to a purely agricultural economy) and the later Marshall plan (to re-industrialise Germany, later applied to other European countries, Japan and Korea). more...

This book serves as an introduction to the history books of the Penguin Classics series. It introduces historians from Herodotus to the present day. It looks at each historian on theor own terms, showing how their objectives varied widely. Earlier historians were principally concerned to record events that might otherwise be forgotten, to serve both as a commemoration of meritorious actions and as a warning of the bad. Later historians, beginning in the nineteenth century, began to look back beyond their own days to reconstruct the past from archives and other sources, so changing the nature of the historian's task. more...

Enthusiastic about his subject, Robin Lane Fox traces Alexander's military expedition from Macedon to India and back to Babylon. Fox's strengths are his command of the sources and his willingness to challenge existing interpretations. Fox is uncritical of Alexander's aggression and cruelty, seeing these through (as far as he can) the mores of Alexander's own time. more...

Now it might be said that Taleb's argument can be simply put as, Do not assume a normal distribution. But then, so much of the quantative analysis that underlay financial risk models (and the consequent assurances of financial stability) were based on just that assumption. As far as I could tell, the only justification anyone ever presented was that it made the mathematics possible. Possible, but delivering predictions that did not match up to what actually happened. more...

It must lose them sales and customers, and it would not be to hard for them to fix. I have even told them about it myself. But they still continue... I should explain that I do not live, and have never lived, in the United States. Amazon know that, as they have my billing address and my shipping address, and a history of my addresses as I have move from place to place around the world, and I have ordered various books from them. more...

At any rate, that how it seems to me... Shenzhen is a new city in southern China near Hong Kong, and most of it has been built in the past ten years. It's hard to point to anything specific, but the new bar street at Windows on the World seems to come straight out of Second Life. And I am not sure what the cause is. Perhaps it is just the architecture of 2007, (whatever the style is called, with 'modern' and 'contemporary' already taken). more...